Guavadillas aka Granadillas aka Passionfruit

I have always thought a guavadilla to be a cross between a guava and a granadilla – turns out its just a yellow variety of the purple granadilla just bigger and smooth skinned, although I must say that the yellow variety does smell like a guava where as the purple variety doesn’t.  I’m sure if I try hard enough I can even taste a wee bit of guava in the yellow ones too.  They grow in abundance here in our little village and Steff from our garden service was kind enough to share some of his loot with us and even did a second trip to bring me some of the vine for my photos.  Thanks Steff!  Think I shall make some guavadilla infused cupcakes.

Passiflora edulis is a vine species of passion flower that is native to Paraguay, Brazil and northern Argentina (Corrientes and Misiones provinces, among others). Its common names include passion fruit (UK and US), and passionfruit (Australia and New Zealand), purple granadilla and maracuja. In Colombia, the purple passion fruit is referred to as “gulupa”, to distinguish it from the yellow maracuyá.

In South Africa, passion fruit, known locally as Granadilla (the yellow variety as Guavadilla), is used to flavour yogurt. It is also used to flavour soft drinks such as Schweppes Sparkling Granadilla and numerous cordial drinks. It is often eaten raw or used as a topping for cakes and tarts. Granadilla juice is commonly available in restaurants. The yellow variety is used for juice processing, while the purple variety is sold in fresh fruit markets.

It is cultivated commercially in warmer, frost-free areas for its fruit and is widely grown in India, Sri Lanka, New Zealand, the Caribbean, Brazil, Colombia, Bolivia, Ecuador, Indonesia, Peru, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, California, Florida, Haiti, Hawaii, Argentina, Australia, East Africa, Mexico, Israel, Costa Rica, Venezuela, South Africa and Portugal.

The passion fruit is round to oval, either yellow or dark purple at maturity, with a soft to firm, juicy interior filled with numerous seeds.[1] The fruit is both eaten and juiced; passion fruit juice is often added to other fruit juices to enhance the aroma.[2]

The two types of passion fruit have clearly differing exterior appearances. The bright yellow variety of passion fruit, which is also known as the Golden Passion Fruit, can grow up to the size of a grapefruit, has a smooth, glossy, light and airy rind, and has been used as a rootstock for the Purple Passion Fruit in Australia.[3] The dark purple passion fruit is smaller than a lemon, though it is less acidic than the yellow passion fruit, and has a richer aroma and flavour. It tastes like lemons, guava and pineapple combined. [4]

The purple varieties of the fruit have been found to contain traces of cyanogenic glycosides in the skin.[5]

Fresh passion fruit is high in beta carotene, potassium, and dietary fibre. Passion fruit juice is a good source of ascorbic acid (vitamin C)[9], and good for people who have high blood pressure.[10] Some research is showing that purple passion fruit peel may help with controlling asthma symptoms.[11] The fruit contains Lycopene in the mature and immature pericarp.[12]

Information sourced from Wipipedia.

61 thoughts on “Guavadillas aka Granadillas aka Passionfruit

  1. I learned so much new info from this post – how wonderful to have them growing fresh. Passionfruit always feels like it’s packed full of vitamins.

  2. Lovely to see the fresh fruit. I grow the plant here, but only for it’s beautiful flowers, they do fruit – but NEVER ripen. I think I’d have to move to warmer climes :)
    Fab photos !

  3. What a great post, Mandy! Your photography is beautiful — you’ve really gotten to know your new camera and it shows. You taught me a lot about passion fruit today. Thank you!

  4. Hi Mandy, thank you for all that interesting info on the yellow guavadilla, lovely pics.
    I have the purple variaty growing in my garden if you want some, also masses of flowers and lots of fruit, I hope they all ripen because they are one of my favourite fruit. :-)

    • Hi Carol, glad you enjoyed the read and thank you for your lovely compliment. I still have loads of pulp in the freezer for now but will take you up on the offer at a later stage, thank you very much. Have a lovely evening. :-)

    • I want to know where I can get a plant the fruit are delicious and I cant find it. I am from springbok in northern cape

  5. What a gorgeous post Mandy! And filled with all kinds of things I didn’t know. Thank you so much for taking the time to write this, I love, love, love! I need to find some passion fruit, that sounds so good right now….
    Have a wonderful day dear!

  6. I love passionfruit but I haven’t seen this variety with its orange skin. It does look a lot like a lemon to me but when it’s cut open, it’s very obviously a passionfruit. Sorry I haven’t visited your blog in a while – I’ve had a lot of trouble with my new commenting system and your URL doesn’t show up! xx

  7. I’ve never heard “guavadilla” before but know passionfruit! I can’t wait you make cupcakes with these… must be so delicious!!

  8. I love these! You should add Panama to the list of countries that grow them, because my grandparents had a vine in their backyard. We call it Maracuyá and is one of the most popular fruits in my country.
    Wonderful post, thanks for sharing :)

  9. I LOVE these images, did you take these with your new birthday lens? The colours are gorgeous!

      • Don’t worry, see if you can find some tutorials on using it? Perhaps to have to set your camera to macro first? The little flower symbol?

        • Have tried the macro setting :-( Have tried to “google” it but not coming up with the answers / help that I am looking for. Will persevere and get there. I am sure it is a simple 1,2,3 fix. :-) xo

  10. Hi there, please tell me, when will the tree bare fruit? We have a yellow guavadilla plant/tree but it bares no fruit.

    Regards

    Heidi

    • Hi Heidi, I am not sure when your plant will bare fruit – where are you situated?

      Here is an excerpt from http://www.nda.agric.za/docs/Infopaks/granadilla.pdf for you:

      “Depending on the time of transplanting, the first fruit is usually ready
      for harvesting 6 to 9 months after planting. At about
      18 months after planting the crop should have reached its full bearing
      potential. Thereafter, there are 2 main crops annually, namely a summer
      crop from November to January and a smaller winter crop during June
      and July. In the Northern Province and Mpumalanga growers sometimes
      have a third crop during March and April. A limited quantity of fruit
      will, however, be available throughout the year.”

      Hope that helps. :-) xo

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