Prickly (Cactus) Pear Chutney

My dad always finds the most incredible recipes in the newspapers and on our recent visit to Johannesburg, dad handed me the Angel Day Verve page from The Star newspaper with instruction to make him the Cactus Pear Chutney for when he and mom come down over Easter.  You would think that prickly pears would be available on every street corner here in the Eastern Cape but alas, on the few occasions that I have been in town, not one prickly pear to be seen.  Thankfully mom mentioned Food Lovers market who had just enough on hand for the recipe.

The end result is very tasty but I can’t taste the prickly pears.

Prickly (Cactus) Pear Chutney

As seen in the Thursday March 8 2012 edition of Verve, The Star

Ingredients

15 large prickly pears peeled and chopped
4 medium onions peeled and chopped
2cm knob fresh ginger grated
180ml sugar
150ml white vinegar
2 sticks cinnamon

Method

  1. Simmer the prickly pears in a pot over a medium heat until soft.
  2. Strain and remove the pips by pushing the pulp and liquid through a sieve and scraping the underneath side of the sieve as you go along.
  3. Place the strained pulp and liquid with the remaining ingredients in the pot and bring to the boil.
  4. Reduce the heat and simmer for an hour to an hour and a half until reduced and thick, stirring occasionally.
  5. Pour into a sterilised jar / jars seal and cool.

Serve the chutney with a cheese platter and or cold meats and crusty bread.

Peppadew Chutney

Peppadew is the brand name of sweet piquant peppers (a breed of capsicum baccaum) originally grown in the Limpopo province of South Africa and Pete and I are lucky enough to have these magnificent peppers growing in our garden back home.  If you are unable to find these, you can replace them with any other sweet piquant pepper or chilli.

Peppadew Chutney

 

Ingredients

2 410g tins apricot jam
2 big onions diced
½ cup brown vinegar
½ cup brown sugar
8 pepperdews seeded and diced 

Method

  1. Place all the ingredients in a pot and simmer over a moderate heat until the onions are translucent and the sauce has reduced slightly.
  2. Pour the sauce into sterilised glass bottles.

 

Submitted by:  Mandy Frielinghaus, Mauritius